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Mountain Moss — Leucobryum

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Moss Green Roof in the Sun?!!! 0


Moss Green Roof Again








Cool and green describe the new Moss Green Roof at The North Carolina Arboretum located in Asheville, NC. It reflects the value of  mosses in achieving year-round green beauty as well as exemplifying the tolerance of mosses that live in full sun exposure. Yes, SUN not shade mosses are featured in this innovative and creative expression of the WNC mountain landscape. In addition, rainwater harvesting is incorporated into a misting irrigation system to keep these mosses lush.

Rainwater Cistern


Mister Irrigation

Green roofs offer many environmental advantages in reducing the heat index of a building and providing solutions in terms of stormwater run-off in urban areas. For most green roofs, sedums are usually the plants of choice. However, since mosses already grow on roofs in our mountain region, it makes sense to intentionally choose indigenous bryophytes (mosses) as a horticultural preference in creating this demonstration green roof on the garden shed located just outside the Baker Education Center at the NC Arboretum.


Utilizing bryophytes (mosses) that like direct sun exposure Bryophyte types (Polytrichum, Climacium, Entodon, Hedwigia, Atrichum, Leucobryum, Ceratodon and Ditrichum), Mountain Moss has transformed a glaringly bright tin roof into a verdant expanse of moss art. With various shades of green and textures, the mosses will provide additional delight with brilliant reds, golds and bronzes when in sporophytic reproductive stages. When other garden plants are dormant or dead, the mosses will keep on giving joy, even in winter months.


EnkaDrain InstallationPlanted in 2012 during the summer heat wave while temperatures were in the high 90s, the Moss Green Roof has already been subjected to the stresses of extreme weather conditions. Yet, despite extreme heat, torrential thunderstorms, high winds, and hail, the mosses are in tact and adjusting to their new abode. With botanical characteristics that enable mosses to tolerate all types of extremes, these miniature plants are hardy. In the winter when temperatures drop below freezing, the mosses will not only survive... but grow!

Another aspect of the green appeal of mosses is that these non-vascular plants provide solutions to environmental issues such as stormwater run-off, water filtration and erosion control. Since mosses don't require any pesticides, herbicides or fertilizers, there will be no groundwater contamination. To learn more about landscaping options featuring mosses, visit www.mountainmoss.com. If you'd like to see the entire production process of creating this SUN MOSS GREEN ROOF, check out these photographs that document the entire process:  https://picasaweb.google.com/118327841512493525469/MountainMossNCArboretumMossGreenRoofJune2012

Annie Martin, known as Mossin' Annie (that's me up on the roof working) an environmental moss artist/landscaper and owner of Mountain Moss in Pisgah Forest, has spearheaded this moss green roof project. Other Transylvanians involved in the production of the green roof included Joe Bruneau Joe Bruneau, 7 Arts Coop Gallery Director,   and Eric Stephenson, owner of Rite Angle Builders. With minimal structural modifications necessary to prepare the roof, the team has used EnkaDrain (produced by Colbond in Enka) as the primary substrate for planting. Kevin McRae Kevin McRae of K2 Irrigation in Asheville, has connected the existing rain water cistern into a misting system for the mosses on the garden shed roof. Supplemental watering is a key factor in long-term success of any moss feature.

In keeping with the mission of The NC Arboretum to cultivate connections between people and plants through creative expressions of landscape stewardship, this moss green roof project promotes conservation and education through this groundbreaking garden demonstration. Funded by The North Carolina Arboretum Foundation Society, this MOSS GREEN ROOF, located in full sun, could very well be a FIRST in the Green Roof industry in America. It certainly is a moss milestone for me!

Be Cool and Go Green With Moss!

Mossin' Annie





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Moss Diary #2 0

Dear Moss Diary, Today, May 20, 2010 was a FULL day of mossin' fun culminating in a major creative flow. First, I joined other Transylvania Master Gardeners for maintenance work on the rain gardens at the library. We dead-headed lots of Black-eyed Susans. However, the only bryophytes present in the garden are the ones that have migrated by themselves. For some reason, even rain garden designers have not yet considered the value of mosses with other moisture-loving plants. Off to a site consultation, I offered ideas on which mosses will work best in this formal garden. The addition of year-round green mosses will enhance this space and provide enjoyment throughout all seasons, especially when all the perennial flowers die back in the winter. The homeowner understands our spiritual connection to nature and her own delight was obvious as she proudly “showed off” her garden landscape. I left with a resurgence of creative energy as I began formulating my design plan in my head. Since this new project will require a variety of moss types, I went in search of appropriate ones. My first stop was the local recycling/trash center. I'd gotten permission earlier to retrieve mosses growing behind the dumpsters. The guys working there are supportive of my moss passion and gently tease me about my obsession. The various Bryums retrieved will work well in the long crack in front of the door frame and in cracks of the paved sidewalk areas. They were dry and dusty but a good soak at home perked them back up. Obviously, sitting behind a dumpster in the hot sun, is not very romantic compared to harvesting/rescuing in a lush forest location. But, I go where I need to find the right moss plants for landscaping applications. These direct sun mosses need to be cultivated because they have great potential. I'll include different Bryums and Ceratodon in my moss cultivation research project. My next location offered a more serene environment. The birds chirped and the soft breeze caressed me as I scaled a steep bank to retrieve Ceratodon, Bryum, Ditrichum, Atrichum, Polytrichum and a bit of Leucobryum. This area has trees scheduled to be cut with mosses growing nearby subject to destruction. Many were in sporophytic stages. I saw a number of male cups in adjacent colonies. In my solitude, Gucci, my dog, runs around in a frenzy, occasionally checking back in with me as I trudge along with my moss sled in tow. By the time I returned home, my creative juices compelled me to start transforming some ugly stumps and branches into my magical moss creations. They are magical for me, at least. I carefully choose the anchor flower or fern. Usually I use Downy Rattlesnake Plantain, Ebony Spleenwort ferns and Resurrection ferns. I made another magnificent piece to add to my Moss Pointelism series for an upcoming gallery exhibit at the Upstairs ArtSpace Gallery in Tryon, NC. Also, I made three moss fairy gifts for my friends who generously loaned me their EZ Up canopies for the Kenilworth Moss Garden Tour. I'll have fun tomorrow delivering these “moss thank-you's.” As it starting getting dark, I decided to weed my moss fairy garden. Sun mosses require more weeding than other areas. And, those cute little weed flowers I let grow earlier needed to come out to showcase mosses once again. I staged magenta Impatiens at moss vignettes to plant later as my color accents this year. My last communion with mosses was WATERING. Moss-as-art creations require frequent watering to maintain their beauty. In general, I advocate supplemental watering in moss landscapes and I have developed “an eye” for when mosses are thirsty. Also, it helps me wind down from an intense, yet invigorating, mossy day. Go Green With Moss!

Middle-schoolers Making Moss Magic 0

[caption id="attachment_378" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="Yeah, you can touch it!"]Middleschool Moss Mavericks![/caption] Middle-schoolers made moss magic this afternoon in Brevard, NC. About a dozen kids, both boys and girls, actively participated in a lively discussion of bryophytes – focusing on some of our local mosses. They learned botanical names for various types as they had the chance to touch pleurocarpus and acrocarpus types. Using loupes, these Jr. Earthkeepers at Brevard Middle School got to take their own closer look at specimens, including some in sporophytic stage. This afterschool club is sponsored by the Transylvania Garden Club. In a whirlwind of information, these eager moss apprentices learned about unique botanical characteristics, substrates and microclimates. We talked about environmental benefits of having moss lawns versus grass. Responsible land stewardship was mentioned so that kids would recognize the value of mosses as a forest resource and not take moss from our public forests. One young man brought up the myth about the using mosses in the woods as your compass. My response was that it is not a good idea in these parts since you can find mosses growing all the way around trees. You might be going round and round in circles instead of finding North. Culminating our hands-on experience, each student made their own moss dish garden using Dicranum, Thuidium, Heterophyllium, and Leucobryum moss types. Accents of Cladonia lichens (reindeer moss – a moss faker and British soldiers) complemented their miniature green landscapes. Amazingly, girls and guys alike decided to add polished blue-colored glass to simulate a cool stream. Their creativity and enthusiasm at the end of our mossy session was impressive. It makes my moss spirit soar to spend time sharing mosses with kids of all ages. It's been a good day. Making moss magic today has been great fun. Go Green With Moss! [caption id="attachment_379" align="alignleft" width="158" caption="Could she be the next moss maven?"]BMS Earthkeeper now a Moss Artist[/caption]

FAQ #1 Watering your moss garden 0

Since I just finished watering my moss garden, I'll address one of the top FAQs – how much and how often should you water your mosses? First, bryophytes are unique in the plant world for a variety of botanical reasons. No bryophyte or true moss has roots, only rhizoids; therefore, you do not need to drench the soil or other substrate to reach any roots. Mosses have no cuticle – the waxy substance that covers other leaves (good visual image is a rhododendron leaf). The leaf is able to absorb moisture immediately because of this feature. Most mosses absorb 10 times their weight in a matter of minutes. Given these factors, water frequently but not too much.

Mosses will change their appearance as they become rehydrated. Some dramatic differences in color saturation occur as with Leucobryum (pincushion moss) where it can shift from almost white to a “moss” green. Other mosses have more subtle clues but an attentive eye will learn the nuances of recognizing when your mosses have absorbed all the water they can at the moment.

On dry, hot days (even in spring), you may need to water more than once a day. You can water at any time of the day or night. However, the best time to water is in the late afternoon, not the morning. Mosses don't seem to burn or ever mold from an erratic watering time frame. For years, I've watered my moss garden when it looks thirsty, sometimes at high noon on a lunch break or even at midnight under the moonlight.

Of course, you can always use your tactile senses and if the moss feels really dry, most likely, it's time to water again. With all that said, some mosses NEED to dry out like Bryums (sidewalk moss). And, the majority of soil-type mosses (with the exception Sphagnums and Bartramia) will not tolerate constant, soggy conditions or “wet feet.”

Beware of overwatering your mosses!

So, if it doesn't rain, it is important to consistently water mosses. Even if it rains the day before, your mosses may want a drink the next day. Watering and walking on your moss garden are my main recommendations for establishing a successful moss garden.